FILTHY WITCH.

I just happened to like arts & crafts. Particularly witchcraft.

mortem-et-necromantia:

Camazotz, meaning Death Bat, a Lord in Xibalbá, associated with Death, Night and Sacrifice.

(via demoniality)

1337tattoos:

Reece Saville

1337tattoos:

Reece Saville

(via spooksayer)

edgarskeleton:

210/365

edgarskeleton:

210/365

(via edgarskeleton)

proteesiukkonen:

I Am a Bride

A short comic inspired by Finnish werewolf folklore in which it is many times the wedding couple and/or the entire wedding party that is bewitched to turn into wolves by a resentful guest or family member.

(via face-down-asgard-up)

violentwavesofemotion:

The Hours (2002) dir. by Stephen Daldry: Nicole Kidman (with the word “Oscar” stamped on her forehead) delivers a performance of a lifetime playing a rather difficult role while disguising everything that is usually so associated with her. With a fake nose, a cold, dark and distant attitude and above all a rough change to her voice, Kidman portrays Mrs. Woolf exactly as the writers wanted us to grasp her and manages to be the most outstanding of the three despite getting the least screen time. Absolutely amazing.”

(via langleav)

“Trust the vibes you get, energy doesn’t lie.”

—   (via earthvibrations)

(Source: shanharlin, via loveyourchaos)

(Source: kawaiiipastels, via spooksayer)

jeannepompadour:

Tatiana Golitsyna by Francois Nicholas Riss, 1835

jeannepompadour:

Tatiana Golitsyna by Francois Nicholas Riss, 1835

archaicwonder:

Jeweled and Enameled Gold Cross Necklace, from Georgia, Late 17th Century

Made with rubies, sapphires, enamel, pearls and gold. This once belonged to Princess Sophia (Sopio) Nakashidze, née Dadiani (b. circa 1861).

Artists in Georgia were among the first in the ancient world to process metals. Among the archaeological finds of the Trialeti and Bedeni mounds of southern Georgia are fine gold pins, elaborately chased, dating from the second half of the 3rd millennium BC; enamel was used in the production of Georgian jewelery by the 5th century BC.

The country’s geographical position between Turkey, Persia and the Silk Road to the south and the important commercial center of Moscow to the north resulted in foreign influences, including Indian motifs and techniques, appearing frequently in Georgian jewelery throughout the centuries; objects produced before Georgia’s incorporation into the Russian Empire in 1801 bear more markedly Eastern characteristics which, combined with the country’s rich tradition of metalwork, make Georgian jewelery distinctive.

(Source: sothebys.com)

strangeforeignbeauty:

Hugh Vidler | Photographed by Jessica Wolfelsperger

strangeforeignbeauty:

Hugh Vidler | Photographed by Jessica Wolfelsperger